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Posted: Aug 26, 2020, 11:30 AM
In this legal malpractice action, the Michigan Court of Appeals ruled the trial court: 1) should not have summarily dismissed the malpractice claim against the lawyer and her firm and 2) wrongly awarded the lawyer fees for representing herself and her law firm in the matter.
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Posted: Sep 6, 2016, 12:40 PM
The Court of Appeals held that an attorney could not be sued for legal malpractice, even if the attorney missed the deadline for filing a Claim of Appeal.
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Posted: Sep 18, 2015, 10:30 AM
It is not very often that a COA opinion incorporates a visual aid.
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Posted: Jun 29, 2015, 10:20 AM
In Bhama v Garves, unpublished opinion per curiam in the Court of Appeals, issued May 27, 2017 (Docket No. 313721), the Court of Appeals found an appeal regarding legal malpractice by an in pro per psychiatrist to be frivolous. A claim regarding the psychiatrist's termination of employment from the State of Michigan was the underlying case to the legal malpractice suit.
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Posted: Jan 29, 2013, 9:00 AM
In a recent opinion, the Michigan Supreme Court in People v Trakhtenberg, __ Mich __; __ NW2d __ (2012)(Docket No 143386) addressed a very narrow issue (among many larger issues) - the use of collateral estoppel by the prosecution to prevent a criminal defendant from challenging his trial counsel’s effectiveness.
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Posted: Feb 16, 2009, 4:25 PM
In Shannon v Foster Swift Collins & Smith, P.C., former clients brought a legal malpractice suit against the law firm and attorney who represented them in a real estate matter.
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Posted: Jul 24, 2008, 8:50 AM
Recently, the Court of Appeals took on an interesting battle between attorney and former client in Seyburn v Bakshi (Docket No. 272903), where Law Firm was suing its Former Client for unpaid legal fees. Law Firm represented Former Client in multiple cases and lost the trial court litigation and one appeal for Former Client. After paying $92,000 in legal fees, Former Client ceased payment and eventually accrued over $55,000 in legal fees owed to Law Firm. The unpaid fees, not surprisingly, resulted in conflict between the two men and Law Firm moved to withdraw as Former Client’s counsel. The motion to withdraw was granted in September 1993.
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